Workers On Wednesday  7 November
broadcast on SAfm 104-107 and online, Wednesdays at 10 a.m.

Call in number 089 110 420
Whatsapp voice note number 061 410 4107

Even though the majority of South Africans now reside in urban centres, millions of South Africans still live in rural areas. Many live in poverty with limited access to resources and services such as transport, telecommunications, electricity and water. Many are farmworkers and have to survive on low wages and bad working conditions.

In today’s show we look at the situation of rural workers and what is being done to improve their lot

GUESTS

  • Nomhle Links – Spokesperson Boland/De Doorns Labour Community Media Forum

Workers On Wednesday  31 October
broadcast on SAfm 104-107 and online, Wednesdays at 10 a.m.

Call in number 089 110 420
Whatsapp voice note number 061 410 4107

Over the past few years, refugees and migrants have been in the spotlight all over the world. Since the end of Apartheid, millions of migrants and refugees have settled in South Africa – most coming from African and Asian countries. Those who are poor have encountered many problems here including bad treatment and corruption by state officials, xenophobic attacks in townships and discrimination in social life. At the same time our government has promoted an African renaissance and lately under President Cyril Ramaphosa, closer political unity similar to the European Union.

What will this mean for us, should we still have national borders?

GUESTS

  • Tendai Bhiza – People Against Suffering Oppression and Poverty
  • Loren Landau – African Centre for Migration and Society at Wits University


Workers On Wednesday  24 October
broadcast on SAfm 104-107 and online, Wednesdays at 10 a.m.

Call in number 089 110 420
Whatsapp voice note number 061 410 4107

In last week’s show we looked at the state of the working class and its prospects of survival during the current period. In this week’s show we take a look at the state of public healthcare and how it affects working class people. For several years, many of us have lamented the state of public healthcare. Millions of South Africans who rely on state healthcare facilities often complain about the long waiting time and poor treatment that they receive.

Inequality in healthcare is also well-known, with only those who can afford medical aid schemes and private medical care having access to top-class treatment and care. For over a decade the government has promised to address this with new policy and the National Health Insurance (NHI). But where are we now?

GUESTS

Workers On Wednesday  17 October
broadcast on SAfm 104-107 and online, Wednesdays at 10 a.m.

Call in number 089 110 420
Whatsapp voice note number 061 410 4107

It is well known that South Africa suffers the highest level of inequality in the world with poverty affecting over 50% of the population. In recent months, with the increase in fuel prices, we are likely to see an increase in transport and food costs, which make up a big portion of working class people’s expenses. With the declining strength of trade unions, it also seems that working class organisations are not strong enough to defend themselves from these attacks on their living standards. In today’s show we look at the state of the working class both socio-economically and politically.

GUESTS

  • Dr Ebrahim Harvey – political analyst, writer and author
  • Dr Trevor Ngwane – Senior Reseacher UJ Centre for Social Change
  • Henriette Abrahams – #TotalShutDown activist based in Cape Town

Workers On Wednesday  10 October
broadcast on SAfm 104-107 and online, Wednesdays at 10 a.m.

Call in number 089 110 4207

For several decades, collective bargaining arrangements between trade unions and employers have operated on a majoritarian system. This simply means that where a trade union has more than 50% membership of a company’s workforce, it had exclusive organisational rights such as access to company premises to meet with members, stop-order facilities for members’ subscriptions, and the right to represent them in legal processes, as well as collective bargaining. This favour to majority unions was codified in the Labour Relations Act of 1995.

However, in a recent case where a new minority union, SACOSWU (South African Correctional Services Workers Union), secured organisational rights within the Department of Correctional Services. The majority union, POPCRU (Police and Prisons Civil Rights Union) objected and the case went all the way to the Constitutional Court which decided in favour of the minority union.

In today’s show we learn more about the case, the rationale for the Concourt’s decision and its implications for collective bargaining in South Africa.

GUESTS

  • Mabu Tjotji - SACOSWU President
  • Richard Mamabolo - POPCRU National spokesperson [could not be contacted]

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Events

 


Zwide, Port Elizabeth
1 June

Publications

russian revolution

 

100yrs cover img

 Solidarity with Palestine booklet cover

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