Western Cape Education wants schools to raise funds from the sale of alcohol

Interested parties believe that the sale of alcohol at school premises will have negative effect on education

The proposal to amend a bill that could allow for the selling of alcohol on school premises, has not been welcomed by many in the Western Cape Province. This is after the provincial Department of Education proposed this bill as a means of raising funds for schools. Elitsha asked some of the different parties for their views on the matter.

Khayelitsha, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

The proposal to amend a bill that could allow for the selling of alcohol on school premises, has not been welcomed by many in the Western Cape Province. This is after the provincial Department of Education proposed this bill as a means of raising funds for schools. Elitsha asked some of the different parties for their views on the matter.

Abongile Mfikili, a 19-year-old Grade 10 learner at Siphamandla Senior Secondary School is against the selling of alcohol on school premises as it would lead to ill-discipline. “There will be no respect for teachers. Learners will use teachers to buy them that alcohol, school is a place of learning not drinking for learners, teachers or parents. Why can’t they think of other ways of fundraising than killing our future?” If this happens other people will use it as an opportunity to sell drugs in the school premises, says Mfikili.

Xolisa Sindaphi a father of three feels that the sale of alcohol will encourage learners to drink. “School premises are meant for teaching, learning and instilling good moral values so allowing alcohol there will be like encouraging learners to drink. The country – especially black townships – are currently faced with broken families and it‘s partly due to alcohol abuse”.

The South African Youth Council in the province says it is disappointed by the intention of the provincial department to allow schools to sell alcohol on their premises. SAYC Provincial Secretary Zuko Mndayi says that the proposal will have a negative impact on the future of many schooling children and will result in escalating social ills. “We are pleased and welcome other amendments – like that of having interventional facilities for expelled learners and oversight bodies in public schools – but strongly stand opposed to the one of alcohol sale in school premises as it will defeat the purpose of going to school in the first place,” says Mndayi.

Also read:  Divisions over shale gas in Morocco

Mndayi says they will make efforts to engage the office of the MEC of Education on this issue and call on the public to use the opportunity to comment on the amendment before it is tabled at provincial legislature.

The South African Democratic Teachers Union’s branch secretary, Vusumzi Mahobe says that for a long time they have been involved in campaigns that seek to ensure that there are no shebeens close to schools. He says schools should be protected as institutions of learning and learning where alcohol cannot be sold. “There are many [other] ways schools can use to raise funds. This may perpetuate the already drinking culture among kids and it could do more harm to society.”

Mahobe believes that the bill contradicts the national draft bill which plans to only grant liquor licenses to operators whose premises are at least 500 meters away from schools. Government can also not guarantee that the sale of alcohol in schools will be regulated and would not be able to control this properly.

Debbie Schäfer, the MEC of Education says the bill is still being amended and if it’s passed in its current form it would depend on the HOD to grant a school permission to sell alcohol. This is meant for school fundraising at special events where alcohol will be sold to teachers and parents attending that event.

She emphasized that alcohol will not be available daily, and that only schools that meet certain criteria would be permitted.

 

Copyright policy

Creative Commons LicenceThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Should you wish to republish this Elitsha article, please attribute the author and cite Elitsha as its source.

All of Elitsha's originally produced articles are licensed under a Creative Commons license. For more information about our Copyright Policy, please read this.

For regular and timely updates of new Elitsha articles, you can follow us on Twitter, @elitsha2014, and/or become a Elitsha fan on Facebook.

About Unathi Tuta 13 Articles
Unathi is a reporter with a huge passion for news and politics. She started in the media industry from 2011 up until now.